Limey Kennels' Nelis Rom

Limey Kennels “Nelis” ROM

“Nelis” was born around 1980-1981 and was sired by Mr Bulldog’s Champion “Spike” (Hammond’s Ch. “Jo”). His dam was Hammond’s (Mr. Bulldog’s) “Jessy”. “Nelis” was one of six pups from the litter, his brother J. B. “Spike Jnr.” won one and another “Klinker” lost dead game to a son of Pieter’s “Pilot” who outweighed him by six pounds.
His brother “Trouble” was schooled and tested. Sisters “Lucky” and ”Paddy” was schooled and tested hard, and a sister called “Suzy” was said to have quit, yet when bred to Champion Willy Booger and a Rufus / Heinzl dog produced some good ones.
“Nelis” was sold to a man called Van Leeuwen. At eighteen months old he began his career and was brought back to be two-dogged by his sire Champion “Spike” and a half-brother Champion “Ringo”. He was then matched into Nico’s Champion “Sting” who was out of “Handsome” & “Hot Lips”. “Handsome” was out of “Bolio”, and “Hot Lips” out of Grand Champion “Hank” Because of a lack of conditioning, bad advice and going two pounds uphill, he lost this contest in a deep game fashion. When the match was over “Nelis” was left dying in the pit.
Mr Golden Eye asked that if he could save the dog, could he then keep him and was told he could. So Mr Golden Eye worked all night to reconstruct the dogs face and ultimately save his life. A few weeks later Mr Golden Eye came back to collect “Nelis” and were told by Mr Bulldog and U & S kennels that they wanted a treadmill for the dog. So, Mr Golden Eye built them a treadmill and returned once again to collect the dog. He was told he could have the dog, but would have to pay two hundred and fifty pounds extra.
He then started making arrangements to bring “Nelis” into the United Kingdom. As the dog was so badly damaged he knew that he couldn’t bring him in the conventional way and would therefore have to smuggle him into the country. A small rowing boat with an outboard motor was rented and the North Sea was crossed. Having had to swim the remaining part of the journey Mr Golden Eye changed into some dry clothes and finally walked “Nelis” into the UK.
At the time King Limey had a two-time winning bitch called “Tug”, who was a litter sister to Irish Tim’s Champion “Lochem”, one of the two best match dogs Jack Kelly ever saw? (The other was Tudor’s “Spike”) “Tug” came out of Curtis’s “Fox Jnr.” and Uptown’s Champion “Snubby”. When “Nelis” and “Tug” were bred the mating produced a R. O. M. litter containing Champion “Dutch”, Champion “Gnasher”, Champion “Smuggler” and “Fatso”.
“Nelis” was bred to “Tug” three times and they produced high calibre dogs in every litter. “Nelis” was bred twelve or thirteen times and subsequently produced six Champions. When inbred on his mother Champion “Dutch” produced Champion “Neilson” and “Popeye”, who in return are registered R. O. M. dogs. “Nelis” and his ability to reproduce is pure gold. You can cross it with every bloodline and it will produce winners. His inbred son Champion “Neilson” R. O. M. was bred to an English Show Stafford and produced Grand Champion “Bella”.

Mr John P Colby was an active breeder for many years and produced some of the best dogs of his time. Much of his foundation stock was from the Gas House and Burke strains, as were the dogs of many other breeders. The difference in the quality of the dogs Mr Colby produced was the result of breeding principles he employed. Also, Mr Colby in my opinion possessed a very important attribute, which I refer to as a gift.

Mr Colby practised a simplified version of genetics, Best to Best, selective breeding

Pictured is John P. Colby Age 20.

Best to Best does not mean performing dogs alone. It entails all aspects of the dogs, from performance to pedigree. The most obvious qualities would be gameness, biting power, talent, stamina and a great bloodline. A bloodline is the result of a breeders influence.

Over the years dogs bred by Mr Colby began to exhibit physical and mental characteristics such as conformation, colour and gameness which distinguished them. These dogs were then referred to as Colby Dogs. Thus we have the Colby Bloodline. People were proud to say, “This here is a pure Colby dog”. This sounds simple; and it leads people to ask; why there were not more top breeders? I believe deciding on what is Best to Best is the key.

I’m not sure that every dog Mr Colby bred to was Dead game; and I’m equally sure he did not breed to every Dead game dog he owned. This is where the gift comes in. It seems to be an in-born sense or ability. I believe most outstanding accomplishments have been made by men who were endowed with a gift for their respective fields.

I do not believe that man knows enough about genetics at this time to produce great animals; and he most certainly didn’t know enough in the days of Mr Colby. Race horse people spend millions of dollars a year, trying to produce great horses, with only marginal success. Similarly, there is no pattern for producing Great dogs.

FriendsThe most essential qualities a breeder may possess are; dedication, a gift, a knowledge of Best to Best, and money might come in handy. If a breeder combines these attributes he is likely to produce, with luck, a great strain of dogs.It doesn’t take too much effort to recall the great Colby dogs of the past. These dogs were bred from the pit and for the pit.

But all of this brings us to a very important question; When a strain of dogs that were once highly regarded, such as Colby’s, stops producing consistently good pit dogs, is this strain still to be considered good? I have heard people say, “I know he’s a cur, but the blood is there”. While this is true in many cases, I wonder how long we can continue to breed to curs and hope to produce game pit dogs.

What is good blood and how long will it remain good if we continue to breed to dogs, who do not possess the qualities of their ancestors? While great breeders can breed to dogs who themselves do not exhibit good qualities; can the average breeder afford to take this gamble?

I have seen strains of dogs that have not produced dogs fitting this description for many years, and people who are active in the sport refer to them as good blood or good brood stock. Many seem to proceed under the assumption, that once a bloodline is good it remains good forever. Many well-meaning people have continued to breed Colby dogs exclusively, thinking all that was necessary to preserve the quality of the strain, was to breed to a dog that had the name Colby on his pedigree.

Pictured is Colby’s Jerry 1900.

I believe that we have to continuously strive to improve the strain, in order to keep it as good as it was or is. It’s an accepted theory, that in order for an institution to continue, it must change and continuously seek to improve. To preserve a bloodline, there is more required than just breeding to dogs whose pedigree shows a particular name. Change is required in order to prevent change in the quality of dogs produced. The Colby strain was developed by change.

FriendsI have heard people say, that the dogs of yesteryear were gamer than those of today. Could it be, in some cases, because we have tried to play Pat and in doing so have lost ground. The people that have bred Colby dogs exclusively for these many years, thinking they were doing what was best, have perhaps underestimated their own ability to breed good dogs.Many of them have bred dogs for 40 years or more and could have perhaps contributed much more to their own dogs, by using their own ideas and experience. New ideas are necessary in every field. Sports records are consistently surpassed by those not satisfied with repeating someone else’s past performance. Last year’s record won’t win this year’s meet.

Were the dogs of yesteryear really superior? I’m sure many dog men of the past would think we have it too easy, because we don’t have to grow secret vegetables and cook our dog’s food or boil their water. Penicillin has replaced many old remedies, making better dog care possible. I have read some diets that top dog men used. While some were good, none could compete with any good commercial dog food available in countless supermarkets. The poorest feeder today is able to provide better nutrition than the best feeder of yesteryear. We also have refrigeration and other conveniences.

It is not my intention to criticise old-timers and their methods. How many of us would be feeding as many dogs if we had to cope with the same adverse conditions? I think our mission however, is to pick up where they left off, emulating their objectives rather than their methods. The Colby dogs of the past, fit the description of good blood, as their pit records indicate. The Colby strain was developed on the principle of Best to Best. When that principle is no longer employed there is bound to be a drastic change in quality. In a very short period of time a great strain of dogs can be reduced to a strain that can do no more than refer to their pedigree and say “My great, great, grand-daddy was a pit dog….I think!”

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